Please Welcome Carol, our New Kinesiology Student!

Carol Bryans, Co-Op Kinesiology student from University of Waterloo

I have always been fascinated with the human body and how rapidly you can recover from injuries. This interest has led me to pursue a degree in Kinesiology with a minor in Medical Physiology at the University of Waterloo. I am currently a third year co-op student who has the wonderful opportunity of working here for the next few months. I am looking forward to working with such a great team of physiotherapists and chiropractors!

My personal experience as a dancer and my own experience with injuries has inspired me to pursue a career in healthcare and rehabilitation science, and I’m excited to learn more about the techniques used in injury rehabilitation and prehabilitation. 

In my spare time I enjoy cooking, reading, exercising, and I enjoy being outside as much as possible. Most of the time you can catch me doing yoga or reading in the park!

UPPER CROSSED SYNDROME

By Dr. Matt Rhynold, DC

What is it?

Before you begin reading this post, take a look at how your body is positioned.

  • Are you slouched?
  • Is your head bent forward looking down at your phone?
  • Are your shoulders rounded?

If so, you’re not alone. Cell phone use is just one of many factors that can contribute to neck pain, as well as a condition I am highlighting today. Upper Crossed Syndrome is a very common condition experienced by many individuals. It is characterized by:

  • a head forward posture
  • rounded shoulders
  • and a specific pattern of weak and strong muscles that can contribute to stiffness and pain in the neck and upper back.

Think about a teeter totter – the more weight you put on one side, the more weight you need to add to the other side to keep the bar level. The same is the case with your neck.

The average human head weight anywhere from 20-30lbs. Head forward posture adds that weight to the front of the body, causing the muscles in the back of the neck and upper back to work on overdrive to keep your head level and your neck stable. Can you imagine holding a 20-30lbs weight for minutes, sometimes hours, on end? It’s no wonder that in Upper Crossed Syndrome, these muscles holding onto your head are overused and can become injured. Moreover, muscles critical for the normal maintenance of neck posture are underused and not properly recruited.

What factors can lead to Upper Crossed Syndrome?

  • Increased cell phone use
  • Increased laptop/computer use
  • Improper work ergonomics (especially while working from home)
  • Prolonged time sitting and slouching
  • Improper breathing techniques

Am I stuck like this forever?

No! In fact, corrective exercises have been shown to restore normal functioning of the neck muscles and improve posture. Exercises targeting underused muscles of the neck and lower trapezius can improve head forward posture, rounding of shoulders, and shoulder blade positioning.

Manual therapists like myself are able to identify which structures need to be addressed and create a treatment plan that incorporates hands-on care with exercises that can not only correct your problems now, but prevent them from returning.

If you are having neck pain and want it assessed and treated, please book an appointment with me.

My treating hours at Clarkson Sport & Physiotherapy are:

Tu 11:30am – 7:30pm
Th 10am – 3:30pm Fri 10am – 3:00pm Sat 10am – 3pm

https://clarksonphysio.ca/

Dr. Matthew Rhynold, D.C., B.Sc Kin (Hons)

Walking speed, part 1: How fast should I walk to cross the road safely? Fast facts about walking speed

The Bottom Line

  1. Our walking speed changes as we age and is predictive of our life expectancy and changes that are likely to occur in other areas of functioning. 
  2. Men have faster speeds than women probably because they are taller.
  3. Walking at 1.14 metres/second means that you can cross the street safely in time before the light changes.

In this two-part series of blog posts on walking speed we look at what you need to know and how to improve your walking speed. In Part 1, we’ll look at some of the basics and a simple test you can do to determine your walking speed. In Part 2, we discuss how to improve your walking speed.

What advice do you have about walking as I get older?

Walking speed (gait speed) or mobility is necessary for most tasks that humans undertake. Slowing of walking speed is associated with aging in all persons. Walking speed has also been associated both with how long a person will live (survival) (1;2) and with changes that occur when older persons are having difficulty or become unable to do tasks (3;4). In research studies walking ability has been assessed by tests where persons are either asked to walk at their usual speed (sometimes called self-selected walking speed) OR fast walking speed where a person is instructed to walk as fast as they can safely.

How fast do I need to walk to cross the road safely?

To undertake various activities within the community that involve walking, the average distances required to walk vary from 200-600 metres (5;6). The task that usually concerns older persons most in relation to walking speed is how quickly they need to walk in order to cross a road safely. The critical speed cited for this task is 1.14 meters/second and has been broken down in the following way:

  1. Crossing a 2 lane road (4 metres/lane) in 10 seconds (5 seconds per lane),
  2. And 3 seconds to get up and down off either curb (1.5 seconds per curb).
  3. The critical speed is 8 metres/7 seconds = 1.14meters/second.

The speed we are able to walk decreases as we age. There are several reports that indicate some normal ranges for older persons. For example, general walking speeds for community activities are 1.2-1.4 metres/sec until 80 years and 1.0-1.8 metres/second until 90 years and older (4;7-10).

Older persons who have a walking speed of less than 1metre/second have reported ceasing involvement in any regular physical activity (11). Self- selected walking speed associated with frailty has been reported as less than 0.65 metres/second if you are short (i.e. = 159cm) and 0.75m/sec if you are taller (height >159cm) (12).

How does my walking speed compare to others of my age?

Below is a Table (8) of usual walking speeds given for women and men by different age groups.

GenderAge group Total number of persons in each study Average self-selected walking speed (metres/second)Range within which the average value might fall (metres/second) 
 Women 40-49 142 1.39 (1.34-1.41) 
  50-59 456 1.31 (1.22-1.41) 
  60-69 5013  1.24 (1.18-1.30)
  70-79 8591 1.13 (1.07-1.19) 
  80-99 2152 0.94 (0.85-1.03)
 Men 40-49 96 1.43  (1.35-1.51) 
  50-59 436  1.43  (1.38-1.49) 
  60-69 941 1.34 (1.26-1.41)
  70-79 3671 1.26 (1.21-1.32)
  80-99 1091 0.97 (0.83-1.10)

Assessing your own walking speed

You can assess your walking speed using the 10 metre walk test. You need a 20 metre path with 5 metres to get up to normal speed, 10 metres for measurement of your normal walking pace and 5 metres to slow down. You should measure how long it takes you to walk the 10 metre length or get someone else to time your walking speed over this distance. The figure below illustrates how to do this.Image showing 10 metre test


AUTHOR DETAILS

Julie Richardson

Julie Richardson is a Professor in the School of Rehabilitation Science at McMaster University. Her research interests include identifying persons at risk for functional decline and rehabilitation interventions it and maintaining health status in persons with chronic illness. Recent work has involved clinical trials examining complex rehabilitation interventions in primary care settings. There are no conflicts of interest.

References

  1. Studenski S, Perera S, Patel K, Rosano C, Faulkner K, Inzitari M, et al. Gait speed and survival in older adults. JAMA 2011 Jan 5;305(1):50-8.
  2. Hardy SE, Perera S, Roumani YF, Chandler JM, Studenski SA. Improvement in usual gait speed predicts better survival in older adults. J Am Geriatr Soc 2007 Nov;55(11):1727-34.
  3. Abellan van KG, Rolland Y, Andrieu S, Bauer J, Beauchet O, Bonnefoy M, et al. Gait speed at usual pace as a predictor of adverse outcomes in community-dwelling older people an International Academy on Nutrition and Aging (IANA) Task Force. J Nutr Health Aging 2009 Dec;13(10):881-9.
  4. Bohannon RW. Comfortable and maximum walking speed of adults aged 20-79 years: reference values and determinants. Age Ageing 1997 Jan;26(1):15-9.
  5. Andrews AW, Chinworth SA, Bourassa M, Garvin M, Benton D, Tanner S. Update on distance and velocity requirements for community ambulation. J Geriatr Phys Ther 2010 Jul;33(3):128-34.
  6. Brown CJ, Bradberry C, Howze SG, Hickman L, Ray H, Peel C. Defining community ambulation from the perspective of the older adult. J Geriatr Phys Ther 2010 Apr;33(2):56-63.
  7. Waters RL, Lunsford BR, Perry J, Byrd R. Energy-speed relationship of walking: standard tables. J Orthop Res 1988;6(2):215-22.
  8. Bohannon RW, Williams AA. Normal walking speed: a descriptive meta-analysis. Physiotherapy 2011 Sep;97(3):182-9.
  9. Lusardi MM. Is walking speed a vital sign? Absolutely. Topics In Geriatric Rehabilitation 2012;28(2):67-76.
  10. Chui K hEKD. Meaningful changes in walking speed. Topics In Geriatric Rehabilitation 2012;28(2):97-103.
  11. Shimada H, Suzukawa M, Tiedemann A, Kobayashi K, Yoshida H, Suzuki T. Which neuromuscular or cognitive test is the optimal screening tool to predict falls in frail community-dwelling older people? Gerontology 2009;55(5):532-8.
  12. Bohannon RW. Comfortable and maximum walking speed of adults aged 20-79 years: reference values and determinants. Age Ageing 1997 Jan;26(1):15-9.

Welcome to Dr. Matt Rhynold, DC

Chiropractor

Dr. Matthew Rhynold was born and raised in Toronto, Ontario. As an avid baseball and hockey player growing up, Matt utilized chiropractic care to overcome various injuries to his shoulder, neck, and back. Seeing the positive impact Chiropractors could make in people’s lives, he knew from age 13 that he wanted to be a Chiropractor. Matt received his Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Kinesiology from McMaster University, and a Graduate Certificate in Exercise Science & Lifestyle Management from Humber College. Matt then received his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC). Dr. Rhynold is passionate about providing a safe space for all people to feel comfortable being whoever they are while receiving the best possible care. Dr. Rhynold has received specialized training in the GLA:D and PEAK protocols for treating knee osteoarthritis, treating spinal stenosis, as well as a host of other common and sports-related injuries. Dr. Rhynold is also a certified Functional Range Release (FR® Release) Provider for the Spine.

Dr. Rhynold uses a combination of hands-on manual therapy and rehabilitation exercises In his treatments such as:

  • Adjustments
  • Soft tissue release
  • Muscle Release Therapy (MRT)
  • Joint mobilizations
  • Vibration Therapy
  • Active Rehabilitation

Dr. Rhynold is a member of the Ontario Chiropractic Association, Canadian Chiropractic Association and the College of Chiropractors of Ontario.

Outside of clinic, Matthew spends his time exploring new culinary experiences, and staying committed to a healthy and active lifestyle.

Please Welcome Zachary Moll, Physiotherapy Resident!

We are pleased to announce the addition of the fantastic Zachary Moll, PT Resident!

Zack grew up in Oakville, attending French Immersion at Sunningdale PS, and then King’s Christian Collegiate. He attended McMaster for his undergrad in Kinesiology, and then Western University for his Masters in Physiotherapy.

Zachary is a good listener, with compassionate skills and a keen sense of humour. Besides running and cycling he has had experience with many competitive sports.

His career interests lean towards concussion management, vertigo, chronic pain and headache management. He has a personal understanding of concussion rehab as he has been a patient himself.

Please join us in welcoming Zachary to our team! He will be a great asset, and we expect him to be very busy.

Welcome to our newest Physiotherapist!

Michael Wadie is a welcome addition to our team as a Resident Physiotherapist .

He is looking to build a caseload of people with sports injuries.

Free 15 minute consultation is available to see what he can offer you.

Please drop by and say hello!