How Do my Feet Affect my Knees?

THE FOOT TRIPOD

THE FOOT TRIPOD:

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1. Center of the calcaneus.
2. Head of the 1st metatarsal.
3. Head of the 5th metatarsal.

A healthy foot tripod is dependent on:
– Foot structure
– Flexibility of the joints.
– Strength, endurance and control of the muscles.

Dysfunction of one or more legs of the foot tripod can lead to plantar fasciitis (heel pain), pain in the ball of the foot, bunions, hammer toes and numbness to name a few.

CLINICAL APPLICATION:
Structural leg length discrepancies can cause lower back pain, amongst other complications. The body can compensate for this FUNCTIONALLY by increasing foot supination on the shorter side to equalise length. This is done by increasing downward movement and force under the head of the 1st MT, increasing the medial arch height.. compensating with your tripod.

The tripod can also FAIL functionally and create a leg length discrepancy (pictured). When the head of the 1st MT has a weakened or inactive downward force. A uniateral pronated or flat foot posture could result.

PHOTO_8

Can compensation for this occur higher up?

Definitely! If ‘re-supination’ cannot be achieved to restore leg length, another compensation can come from the pelvis.
If you anteriorly rotate the pelvis (ie the innominate rotates forward, bringing the ASIS forward) you can relatively increase leg length. This can be done favourably for one side and create pelvic torsion along with lateral tilt.

Please Welcome Carol, our New Kinesiology Student!

Carol Bryans, Co-Op Kinesiology student from University of Waterloo

I have always been fascinated with the human body and how rapidly you can recover from injuries. This interest has led me to pursue a degree in Kinesiology with a minor in Medical Physiology at the University of Waterloo. I am currently a third year co-op student who has the wonderful opportunity of working here for the next few months. I am looking forward to working with such a great team of physiotherapists and chiropractors!

My personal experience as a dancer and my own experience with injuries has inspired me to pursue a career in healthcare and rehabilitation science, and I’m excited to learn more about the techniques used in injury rehabilitation and prehabilitation. 

In my spare time I enjoy cooking, reading, exercising, and I enjoy being outside as much as possible. Most of the time you can catch me doing yoga or reading in the park!